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Category: EDRM

Quick takeaways on how Fasoo enables zero trust data securityEnterprise Digital Rights Management (EDRM) encrypts files, enforces user access, and controls data in use – no implicit assumptions. It sets a least privilege baseline for sensitive data on which you can dynamically grant increasing levels of explicit access. It’s what Zero Trust is all about.

Inside the perimeter, implicit trust was turned on its head by digital transformation and the hybrid workplace. Zero Trust’s explicit, least privilege, continuous monitoring, and adaptive risk assessment are the new standards for data security in today’s world.

You likely have some set of DLP or Insider Risk Management tools, but these fall well short of the new standards. So how do you move to Zero Trust Data Security?

Learn more about how to bring DLP up to Zero Trust standards.

Consider integrating EDRM. It fortifies your existing tools with strong protection methods and explicit controls. And with Fasoo’s approach to EDRM, gain the high-resolution data visibility Zero Trust continuous monitoring and adaptive access standards demand.

7 Quick Takeaways

Here are 7 quick takeaways on how EDRM and Fasoo can set you on the path to Zero Trust Data Security.

1. File-Centric, Location Agnostic

Go to the source itself. The file. Quit chasing and trying to enforce data security and control at every new place the file may travel, reside, or a user accesses it. Traffic cops at every ingress and egress point are old school, perimeter thinking. Bind all security and privacy controls to the file itself so you can persistently enforce enterprise safeguards in the cloud, WFH, on BYOD, and at supply chain partners.

2. File Encryption

It seems obvious for an explicit-based model. But today’s DLP tactics are mostly a monitor-alert approach while you expose the data to risk. Instead, automatically encrypt sensitive files when users create or modify them. Use centralized policies and hold the keys so users don’t control your data. Use this no-nonsense, least privilege baseline to build explicit access to sensitive data.

3. User Access

You don’t want an insider wandering through an entire repository or even folders – it’s too implicit. Most insider breaches are mistakes in handling sensitive data, like storing it in the wrong location. It’s better to enforce explicit access decisions, for each file, every time a user opens it. That’s Zero Trust Data Security.

4. Control Data in Use

But what happens after an insider gains access to a file? It’s a free pass to copy, cut, paste share, and store sensitive corporate data as they wish. That’s not Zero Trust. If I simply need to read the document, why let me extract or share the data? A supply chain partner needs to edit a file. But why let them copy, print, or store the document locally? Use explicit granular document rights to enforce Zero Trust least privileges and control your data in use.

5. Visibility

Visibility is knowing how your data is used, how it moves about, and what users do with it. Zero Trust relies on data visibility for continuous monitoring. Not easy in today’s hybrid workplace with existing tools. At best, its reliance and reconciliation of disparate security, network, application, repository, and endpoint logs. Better to use file-centric controls to make the file self-reporting, recording all lifetime interactions to a Central File Log no matter where it travels or who accesses it.

6. Continuous Monitoring

Just because you had access before doesn’t matter. That would be implicit trust. Zero Trust wants an explicit, context-aware decision each time. To do so, you need to monitor user identity, prior file interactions, devices, times, and places for each of the thousand if not millions of documents in your inventory. In real-time. Impossible? The Central File Log makes it easy, staging up-to-date, file-specific log data for Zero Trust monitoring.

7. Adaptive Access

Access is no longer an “all or none” decision. More “if so, how much.” It must adapt based on current circumstances, informed by the findings of continuous monitoring, and enabled by deep file visibility. Once you assess the risk, employ a wide range of granular document controls that can enforce the appropriate Zero Trust privileges.

Start on Zero Trust Data Security Now

Adopting a least privilege, explicit access to your sensitive data is key to protect your intellectual property and comply with privacy regulations. Integrating EDRM fortifies your existing tools with strong protection methods and explicit controls that are the cornerstones of Zero Trust Data Security.

As users and data continue to move around, protecting the data itself with these strong controls is your best bet to protect your business and your customers.

 

RELATED READING
Learn more about Enterprise Digital Rights Management
Learn more about how Fasoo implements Zero Trust Data Security

DLP needs EDRM to control data-in-use and protect documents everywhere

Data loss prevention (DLP) solutions focus on the movement of sensitive data. They analyze document content and user behavior patterns and can restrict the movement of information based on preset criteria. With the move to remote work, traditional DLP solutions can’t safeguard sensitive data since it’s difficult to monitor all the locations users can send and store documents.

While DLP is good at finding sensitive data in files, it can’t control access to the data inside. Once a user has access, they can copy and paste the data anywhere. If someone shares a sensitive document with a business partner or customer, DLP has no visibility to that document and can’t control access to it.

Enterprise Digital Rights Management (EDRM) focuses on protecting sensitive data in documents. It automatically encrypts files and controls file access privileges dynamically at rest, in use, and in motion. It provides visibility and control regardless of where the document travels.

Four ways EDRM enhances DLP

 

1. Protects Sensitive Data Wherever It Travels

DLP is a perimeter-based solution that stops the movement of data. By blocking ingress and egress points, you can stop users from copying sensitive documents to a USB drive, a collaboration solution, or the cloud. This presents challenges as security teams try to block all the locations a document can go. With many people working from home and using personal devices (BYOD), this is becoming almost unmanageable.

EDRM takes a file-centric approach to security. It applies encryption, access control, and document usage rights that travel with the file everywhere. Controls are always enforced regardless of location or device. You know your sensitive data is safe even if users access files on new devices or share data with customers, partners, and other third parties.

 

2. Enforces Consistent Controls Across Cloud Environments

You probably have numerous perimeter security solutions across your internal networks, cloud services, and endpoints. This creates inconsistent policies that leave security and privacy gaps. Gartner projects that “through 2025, more than 99% of cloud breaches will have a root cause of preventable misconfigurations or mistakes by end-users.”

With EDRM you set safeguards centrally and retain ultimate control over who can access the data and how. Cloud administrators and end-users can’t remove the protections which remain with the file no matter where the data resides or who accesses it. This simplifies your security controls and eliminates a major reason for a data breach in today’s multi-cloud environment.

Learn more about how to implement consistent data protection controls in the cloud.

 

3. Controls Data-In-Use to Minimize Risk from Insider Threats

Once a verified user gains access to a file, that sensitive corporate data can go anywhere. Users can copy, cut, and paste sensitive data into new file formats, share it in collaboration applications, and store and print sensitive files on personal devices. Someone may not be malicious but accidentally may share sensitive data. How many times have you accidentally emailed a file to the wrong person?

EDRM can apply a broad range of file permissions to control data-in-use. If a user only needs to read a document, you can prevent them from sharing or printing it. If that user needs to edit the file, you can change permissions and allow them to edit, but restrict copying the data to an email or other insecure location. Controlling what a user can do when a file is open stops data breaches by insiders in today’s world of leavers and joiners.

Learn more about how to minimize insider threats.

 

4. File Visibility Ensures Security

Visibility is lost in today’s hybrid workplace because users can store and access data on just about any device and in any location, many not in your control. Traditional DLP and network tools create a patchwork approach to data visibility with some organizations employing over 40 IT and security tools to trace sensitive data.

Advanced EDRM solutions use a file-centric approach to embed a unique ID in each file. It makes the file self-reporting, logging all access and actions taken on the file. This also applies to copies and derivatives, like PDFs. The file is “never lost” and is constantly monitored providing essential feedback for adaptive control and access decisions.

 

EDRM Makes DLP Stronger

By adding EDRM, you can protect your sensitive data regardless of its location and control that all important data in use. This is critical to stop both malicious and accidental insider threats. It lets you sleep at night knowing that your sensitive data is protected, controlled, and monitored at all times.

 

RELATED READING
Learn more about EDRM.
Learn more about how to improve traditional DLP systems.

EDRM deployments on the riseA resurgence of interest in Enterprise Digital Rights Management (EDRM) is trending as cloud, mobile, work-from-home (WFH), personal devices (BYOD) and collaboration platforms create new coverage gaps in traditional data protection approaches.

Gartner reports that EDRM technology, a core solution of Fasoo’s Zero Trust Data Security Platform, entered the “Plateau of Productivity” stage across three of its Hype Cycle Reports. In this Hype Cycle stage:

“the innovation has demonstrated real-world productivity and benefits, and
more organizations feel comfortable with the greatly reduced level of risk.”

Quick Glance Back

Many security veterans recall that EDRM was one of the first data-centric tools to run the gauntlet of operational deployments. IT professionals familiar with network tools were unprepared for the more involved engagement required with business units and end users to protect sensitive data.

EDRM was too often deployed in a decentralized manner forcing users to decide how to implement the wide-ranging capabilities. Improper policy decisions set restrictive enforcement measures that overwhelmed business processes and had a negative impact on worker productivity.

Today, most organizations have a better understanding of the unique challenges to secure and control sensitive data and overcome these earlier missteps. EDRM uses centralized policies, implements capabilities without user interaction, enforces adaptive security, and does not interrupt workflows.

Moving Forward

The ease of EDRM deployments isn’t the only reason for its resurgence. Industry experts also note:

1. EDRM closes DLP coverage gaps triggered by the hybrid workplace

2. EDRM capabilities are essential to Zero Trust Data Security

 

EDRM and DLP

The Gartner Hype Cycle for Cloud Security findings is a good example of where DLP falls short in today’s hybrid and multi-cloud environments. DLP can’t enforce rules at all locations where data may travel, often outside of enterprise controls like WFH or files shared with supply chain partners. And here’s another wake-up call from the Gartner report:

“Through 2025, more than 99% of cloud breaches will have a root cause of preventable misconfigurations or mistakes by end-users.”

With EDRM, you are in control of your data no matter where it travels or who accesses it. That’s because EDRM safeguards – encryption, user access, and data-in-use controls – travel with the file itself. Safeguards are persistently enforced no matter the location. This eliminates misconfiguration and end-user mistakes.

Learn more about “Why DLP Needs EDRM

 

EDRM and Zero Trust

Zero Trust is all about explicit risk assessments. It’s an approach that requires thorough verification of all users, data, and devices, and allows only minimal privileges.

Analysts and many organizations recognize that EDRM is now foundational to Zero Trust Data Security. Its core functionality enables the assignment of minimal privileges to sensitive data and the ability to dynamically grant increasing levels of explicit access. It encrypts, restricts user access, controls the use of data, monitors data, and employs adaptive measures based on context-aware user and device behavior.

Learn more about “How EDRM and Fasoo Enable Zero Trust Data Security

 

A New Perspective on EDRM

EDRM has come a long way since those first projects, and you can feel comfortable deploying this robust technology to protect and control your sensitive data. EDRM also sets you on a path to fortify your existing DLP infrastructure and move to a true Zero Trust Data Security capability.

Fasoo, an EDRM pioneer for the past 20 years with over 2,000 customers and millions of users, has been at the forefront of simplifying EDRM deployments and operational demands. Today, these EDRM capabilities are one of many data-centric tools consolidated into Fasoo’s industry-leading Zero Trust Data Security Platform. This purpose-built, highly automated, centrally managed, data-centric platform lets organizations secure their data better and more easily.

Learn more about “Fasoo’s Data Security Platform

 

Extend your DLP with zero trust data protectionThe term data loss prevention or DLP is used throughout the information security industry to mean any technology that can stop users from sending sensitive information outside the corporate network.  It can take many forms and can include locking down USB ports on PCs, stopping emails from leaving the company, and preventing documents from moving outside of your firewall.  DLP can mean many things to different people.

While DLP can enhance your information security by changing employee behavior, it does so by limiting activities and is dependent on creating adequate policies.  It acts to restrict data use, not enable it.  Business users need to legitimately share and use information and preventing that can cause problems.

DLP has two main functions, monitoring, and blocking.  Many organizations only monitor activity to understand usage patterns.  Once they start blocking the movement of information, there are typically a lot of exceptions because people need to get their jobs done.  If you are only monitoring data access and movement, you are not protecting the data.  You are only aware of a problem after the data has left your organization and already gotten into the wrong hands.  If you throttle back blocking to the point where it is primarily monitoring, you have the same situation.

What are some of DLP’s challenges?

DLP’s ability to scan, detect data patterns, and enforce appropriate actions using contextual awareness reduces the risk of losing sensitive data.  It depends on policies to govern the movement of information, and those policies can become complex to manage.  A lot of companies will monitor and potentially block personally identifiable information (PII), personal health information (PHI), social security numbers, PCI data, and any data that is governed by regulations.  You can easily write policies to block this information, but what about all the trade secrets and intellectual property (IP) that really drive your business?

The problem is that most businesses need to share sensitive data with outside people.  DLP does not provide any protection in case users have to send confidential information legitimately to a business partner or customer.  It cannot protect information once it is outside the organization’s perimeter.  This has become more of an issue with remote work becoming the norm for many businesses.

Considering most data leaks originate from trusted insiders who have or had access to sensitive documents, organizations must complement and empower the existing security infrastructure with a zero trust data security solution that protects data in use persistently.

Add zero trust data security

By adding context-aware data protection to DLP, you ensure that only authorized people can access sensitive information no matter where it is.  The three key areas to consider are:

    • Encryption – by encrypting the data with centralized security policies, you can extend the monitoring capabilities of DLP.  If the information does leave your network, it is always protected and under your control.  If an unauthorized person tries to access that information, the protected data will appear as useless bits.  This policy can even apply to authorized people who are on the wrong device, or in the wrong place.
    • Control use of the data – apply a persistent security policy that travels with the data and controls what a user can do with it when they open a file.  By limiting editing, copy & paste, or printing, you eliminate sharing data with the wrong people.  This can extend to immediately revoking access to files once shared, regardless of location or device.
    • Monitor and validate use – continuously validating user access to sensitive data is critical since people’s roles change and the data may not be relevant if the person changes jobs or leaves your organization.  This ensures you only grant access to sensitive data if and when a user needs it.

 

Today data is everywhere and continues to grow.  I could access a file on my mobile device, move it to the cloud, copy it onto my PC, and then move it into a document repository.  Keeping up by managing and monitoring every location and every device is almost impossible.  It’s like playing whack-a-mole.  You plug one hole and another appears.

You need to expand your thinking on how you protect your data, by locking it at the moment you create it and continuously validating user access.  This gives you visibility and control through its entire lifecycle.

 

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